Espresso coffee in Diu

diu

 

Diu is a small island off the south coast of Saurashtra in Gujarat. Formerly, a Portuguese colony (until 1960), it is now part of India.

 

Shri Ramvijay Refreshment on Bunder Road serves snacks, ice creams and drinks, and is the only place in the city of Diu where espresso coffee can be obtained. The owner bought his Italian espresso-making machine at great expense several years ago. It is a device resembling the Lavazza (LB2312) model for producing single cups of coffee, which was already on the market in 2009. We drank acceptable cups of coffee made with pre-packed coffee capsules placed in this machine. It was the best coffee we had drunk since leaving Bombay, but each tiny cup cost several times as much as the cups of tea available all over Diu and Gujarat. Mr Ramvijay told us that the demand for his coffee was greatest amongst visitors to Diu of Indian origin, who lived in Mozambique and other parts of East Africa.

There are photographs of three previous generations of the Ramvijay family on the café’s rear wall. The present owner Mr Ramvijay explained that his shop was opened in 1933 and has been in business continuously since then. In 1933, it was known as ‘Casa De Refrescos, Ramvijay’. It was started by Shri Mathurbhai Devjibhai Arya, who was born in 1881 in the village of Fudam on Diu Island and established a still functioning soda water factory. Mr Ramvijay told us that he is the major supplier of bottled soda water in Diu. The café is also well-known for its ice cream sodas.

 

Find out much more about Diu and its neighbour Gujarat, by CLICKING:

HERE or HERE  or HERE

Going vegetarian in Gujarat

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Travellers visiting Gujarat should be aware that the majority of food served in the state is vegetarian. In bigger places like Ahmedabad and Baroda, finding non-vegetarian food is less of a problem than in smaller places. If you visit Bhavnagar, the Nilambagh Palace Hotel serves very good food – both veg and non-veg. Many people hanker after Gujarati thalis, but I am not one of these people. Those who are not on the Gujarati meals can easily find well-prepared south Indian vegetarian food like dosas, idli, and vada. Pizzas are also widely available, often with excellent tomato sauce made with fresh tomatos. 

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Gujarati thali

Another thing to consider when planning your trip to Gujarat is that it is a dry state: alcohol is not served in any public places. It is possible to get a permit (I have no idea how) to be allowed alcohol ‘for medical purposes’ (!)  Gujaratis and others desperate for booze can cross the border into either Daman or Diu, both of which were Portuguese colonies until 1961. Now they are administered not by the State of Gujarat, but by the Central Government of India – they are Union Territories. Alcohol is freely available at almost duty-free places in these tiny places, both of which are well-worth visiting.

 

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A mug of chhas

If you are thirsty, there are plenty of soft drinks available including the refreshing watered down yoghurt drink chhas (also known as ‘buttermilk’). Tea is the prevalent hot drink. We found it hard to get decent coffee, let alone any coffee. Most Gujaratis in Kutch and Saurashtra seem to be keen tea drinkers.

 

Discover more about journeying through Gujarat in Adam Yamey’s new book:

GUJ LULU PIC
Paperback available from lulu.com, Amazon, bookepository.com, Kindle, or order it from your bookshop [ISBN: 978-0244407988]